Share
 
Cranberry Pistachio Biscotti
Cranberry Pistachio Biscotti
Biscotti originates from the Latin word “biscoctus”meaning twice baked/cooked and can be stored for very long periods of time.Such nonperishable food was particularly useful during journeys and wars, and twice baked breads were a staple food of the Roman army.

Cranberry Pistachio Biscotti are crisp and crunchy and are lower in fat as they do not contain butter which makes them a nice alternative to all the other rich baked cookies. These have a long shelf life so they can be made well ahead of time and they are so good you may even want to give them as gifts (perfect for the tea and coffee lovers).

Enjoy dunking it in a cup of tea or coffee!

Recipe



 
 
 
Honey Sesame Chilli Potatoes
Honey Sesame Chilli Potatoes
I love to eat Chinese and need to satiate my cravings every other day. My husband and daughter have a similar thing for Chinese food. So to give our taste buds a change from the regular fried rice and noodles, I decided to venture into a new territory and came across this heavenly recipe. It doesn’t take much expertise just follow the recipe and everything turns out just fine. Enjoy as an appetizer or even a side dish with your favorite dal.

Recipe
 
 
Simply Chocolaty cake
Simply Chocolaty cake
Sometimes you crave for something and you want it right away. I was craving for a really dark chocolate cake and within a matter of minutes I was baking one. It’s easy and quick to make, the kids might want to eat it with a glass of milk and adults with coffee or tea. My four year old daughter who’s at home these days enjoyed adding the ingredients and we both had a great time baking it!

The recipe is from smitten kitchen.com 

Recipe


 
 
 
Punjabi Kadhi
Punjabi Kadhi
Punjabi Kadhi is spicy yogurt-based curry containing vegetable pakoras and is eaten with rice and rotis. One can never go wrong while making it as it is extremly simple to make. The main ingredients are yogurt, gram flour/besan, freshly grated ginger, mustard seeds, asafetida, dried red chilies, fenugreek seeds (methi), and salt. It is prepared by whisking the yogurt, water, flour, turmeric, chili, ginger, and salt, and then cooking the liquid over medium heat until it starts to boil, stirring the whole time so that the water and yogurt do not separate. All the other ingredients are lightly fried in the oil or ghee. This mixture is added to the kadhi, which is then heated to boiling once more.

Years ago, during my school days Dad and I visited Manikaran, the place famous for its hot water springs, a gurudwara, temple and a mosque, all of which lie in close proximity. Also called Parvati Valley, the bridge crosses the span of one mountain to another with a gushing river that lies in between. It’s boxed in at the bottom of a vast sheer-sided chasm. The hot sulphur springs rise in bubbles close to the shore of the river, with people bathing, drinking, collecting or trying to cook rice in the hot water.The Langar at Gurudwara Manikaran Sahib is a combination of dahi kadi , meethe chawal (sweet rice), palak (spinach) and rotis. You may find this combination an odd one, but it was very well cooked and I can still taste it whenever I think of it. The atmosphere was damp and smoky and but the bath in the springs after the arduous bus journey makes you hungry and you relish the langar. Though the kadhi prepared contained simple ingredients, it had the most amazing taste.

Try this dish and I bet you will keep making it over and over again…..

Recipe 
 

Poha

08/10/2010

0 Comments

 
Poha
Poha
Poha is rice which is dehusked and then flattened into rice flakes. It is used in a variety of snacks like chivda namkeen or the famous Maharashtrian kanda pohe. It is very quick to prepare and is light on stomach. Increase its nutritional value by adding boiled vegetables like peas, boiled potatoes, carrots and bell peppers. This recipe is so simple and is ready in a matter of minutes. Enjoy it hot with a cup of tea.

Recipe
 
 
Cheese Chili
Cheese Chili
 
Being in the US has its drawbacks. I miss the tantalizing aromas arising from the roadside dhabas/stalls that mystically stop and turn you around towards them. Your mouth starts to drool gallons of saliva while waiting for your order (delay in the order and the waiting time makes it more desirable) and  just watching the chef tossing the ingredients in his huge wok adding sauces and masalas right in front of you makes you want to dig right in. And when you finally take that first spoon full in your mouth nothing else matters. The clock stops and all you feel is the joy and taste running like electricity through your body.

Of all cuisines I miss Indian Chinese the most. Many overseas Indian restaurants cater to the overseas Indians' nostalgic taste for Indian Chinese food but are hardly able to do justice to the taste and flavors. The spicy manchurian, hakka noodles, cheese chilly, fried rice, momos all prepared in oversized charred woks from repeated use topped with a lingering flavor and smell of kerosene from the burner it was prepared on. Usually the chef is a Nepalese Gorkha or a petite looking north-east Indian with squinty eyes (no offense please) giving the restaurant a more authentic “Chinese” look. I recently found that the Chinese cuisine ranks India's most favorite cuisine (after local food), growing at 9% annually. It is the most favored option when young people go out to eat and the second favorite (after South Indian cuisine) when families dine out. The cuisine is believed to have originated from the Chinese immigrants of Calcutta that spread to the rest of the country (and world).

My love of Indo-Chinese food inspired me to try out this recipe by Neeta Mehta. A traditional paneer recipe with Chinese twist makes it delicious and mouth watering. It involves few ingredients: paneer/cheese, capsicum and onion and is stir fried in sauce. Makes a great side dish or appetizer that will surely rock your taste buds and leave your guests complementing your cooking skills.

Recipe


 
 
 
Picture
Crispy and tangy stuffed karela
Bitter gourd or karela not only has a warty looking exterior, it tastes bad as well. Its bitterness originates from a bitter compound called momordicin. Despite looks and taste its medicinal value cannot be ignored. It is said to tone the stomach, improving its function and increasing appetite. It also known to help prevent or counteract type-II diabetes by increasing insulin sensitivity thus, lowering elevated blood sugar levels.

Like any other kid I too hated karela. But as I grew I cultivated a taste for it and now I simply adore making and eating it. It is stuffed with spices and then fried in oil, which is very popular in Punjabi cuisine. Another traditional way to cook bitter gourd is with onions, red chili powder, turmeric powder, salt, coriander powder, amchoor and a pinch of cumin seeds. I try to make my recipes as simple and healthy as possible. This is my stuffed version of karela but instead of frying I cook them in a pan with minimum oil. Both my husband and daughter love this recipe and they are gone within minutes.


Recipe
 
 
After days of clicking photos, typing recipes I have finally decided to publish my site.Though its still at an infant stage with very few recipes I wanted  comments and suggestions from readers so as to improve myself from the beginning itself.
Hope you all like my simple recipes and try them yourself at home!